Tips for Students Attending Zoom University

     The University of Maine at Presque Isle will return to fully online on Nov. 23, which means students will need to adapt to a new change in their education. With some UMPI classes already online or hybrid, students will have a head start on transitioning to fully online. Although online learning through Zoom is very flexible and easy-to-use, many students feel they learn best in an environment of in-person classes. 

Tips for students as they transition to online learning.

     The switch to fully online classes this semester plays a huge role in students’ social lives and their mental health. Students will be taking their classes from home and in their bedrooms, which is a much different experience from in a classroom. There are many tips and tricks students can follow to stay focused during these last weeks of the fall semester. 

     Students have been using Zoom for many months now, so they should be getting used to the application. Zoom is very accessible and easy-to-use, so students are now more confident using it. Students should know how to work their camera and mute button. It is always important to arrive on Zoom a couple of minutes before class time. When their camera is on, students should have good lighting and pay attention to their body positioning. It can be difficult to speak on Zoom, so patience is key during participation and conversations with one another. 

     Another tip for students as they switch to online learning is to keep a schedule and stay organized. It is very easy to lose track of time when working on a computer, so making a schedule or to-do list could be helpful. Many students use academic planners to map out their days. Something as simple as Post-it® notes or a sheet of paper can do the job. It is also important to take breaks from your computer screen. Looking at a digital computer screen can be mentally exhausting and physically painful on your eyes. Walking away from your screen is beneficial when you spend long hours on your computer. Take breaks from your computer screen to grab a snack or take a walk during the day. 

     “I like to make lists of everything I have due each week. I think the most important thing with online school is setting aside time to complete schoolwork,” UMPI sophomore, Emily Blauvet, said. “It’s important to have good communication with your professors and stay on top of your work. I just hope for the best!”

     Having a comfortable and pleasant environment is crucial to college students’ educational experience. It is important to find a comfortable workspace to take classes and complete homework in. Students need to be able to feel comfortable and relaxed in their space, whether that is a bedroom or office. Having a cozy chair and a proper desk is something all students should have. 

     When students take classes on Zoom, it can be very easy to become distracted by their surroundings. They are no longer in a learning environment inside a classroom. They are no longer face-to-face with their classmates, so it is easy to get distracted from their classes on Zoom. Students can take away distractions around them by turning off their phones or other electronic devices. Sometimes when classes have more students, it can be easier to lose focus. 

     Students also should take care of their bodies and minds during these last weeks of classes. Having good physical and mental health will benefit students and their academics. Students should be getting enough sleep, even if that means taking naps during the day. They should be drinking plenty of water, not just coffee in the morning. Students can also incorporate exercise and a healthy diet into their routine. Taking these steps will allow them to have positive mental and physical health during the rest of the fall semester.  

     “It’s going to be hard going fully online, but I plan on my making a schedule every day to keep me organized. If I stick to my schedule, it is easier for me to adapt to change,” UMPI senior, Marissa Valdivia Reagle, said. “Last semester when we went online, I had to move a desk into my room. I wanted it to be more of a school environment in my room.”

     All of these steps will benefit students in one way of another. Taking classes and completing an education at home is a unique experience. It is definitely not easy. Even real-world professionals are struggling with working remotely and at home. As students travel back home for the holidays, please remember to make your health a number one priority. Having good grades is not as important as taking care of yourself.  Finish the semester and year off strongly because we all need a good break for the holidays. 

 

COVID-19 in the North Pole

  This year has been difficult for everyone, including Christmastime’s very own, Santa Claus. The COVID-19 global pandemic has affected hundreds of areas worldwide and even places such as the North Pole. Santa, Mrs. Claus and all the elves at the North Pole have had to adapt to COVID-19 regulations. With Santa’s older age and weight, he is at high risk for Coronavirus, so he has to be extra safe. Yet even in the face of a global pandemic, Santa is still preparing to deliver millions of presents on Christmas Eve so that children around the world can have a good holiday. 

     People may have seen their local “Santa Claus” in shopping malls or Christmas tree farms around the country. The real Father Christmas has been preparing for months on end at the North Pole with his elves. When COVID-19 took over the world earlier this year, the North Pole was no exception. The elves in the North Pole do not travel much and Santa only journeys outside the area if he has an important meeting. Although there haven’t been any positive COVID-19 cases at the Pole, Santa has all the residents taking precautions as they make toys for Christmastime. 

Be like Santa Claus and wear a mask!

     Santa’s Workshop and everyone at the North Pole have been following CDC guidelines. Santa’s elves have been socially distancing and staying six feet apart in the workshop. Due to this regulation, a large number of elves cannot work in the same space, because of the problems with social distancing. The elves can no longer build toys in large groups at the workshop, so they have been working longer hours. These elves are continuing to stay positive, despite the change in their working environment. Their main goal is to make children happy on Christmas Day. 

     “It has been a very different year at the North Pole. We still drink plenty of hot chocolate and sing Christmas carols, but it hasn’t been the same. Santa has done a great job cheering us up,” Buddy, a North Pole elf, said. “We have been working longer hours, but we do not mind because our ultimate goal is for every child to have a wonderful Christmas. We want to do everything we can to cheer them up from this terrible year.”

     Everyone in the North Pole has been wearing masks: Christmas themed ones, of course. Every elf working on toys has been using hand sanitizer and wet wipes. Although elves have had to follow all of these regulations, they are still very energetic and excited for Christmas, as usual. 

     Santa recognizes that families around the world, especially in the U.S., may be struggling financially. He wants to do as much as he can for these families. Santa plans on delivering to all children across the world who are deserving. Many individuals died from the virus this year. People also lost their jobs throughout this year, so they were unable to provide for their children. With COVID-19 playing a huge role in the economy and health of the United States’ population, Santa and Mrs. Claus want to make this Christmas a special one for families in need. 

     “When this virus hit, we didn’t know what to do. We could see that the elves were losing some of their Christmas spirit and that the reindeer were upset,” Mrs. Claus said. “Nick has been working endlessly to make everyone feel safe and I couldn’t be prouder of how he has dealt with everything.” 

     Christmas is a year-round event at the North Pole and when COVID-19 surprised the world, Santa acted quickly. The North Pole was able to continue its progress in the workshop, while following CDC regulations. There haven’t been any parties or gatherings this year at the North Pole, but the elves have continued to show Christmas spirit. Santa will be delivering gifts on Christmas Eve, like any other year. His sleigh will be sanitized and ready to go for his long journey delivering gifts. Despite this eventful year, Santa is doing everything he can to make this holiday season a memorable one for millions of families in the world. 

How to ‘Boo’ Your Friends This Halloween While Sticking to a Budget

Holidays in the times of Corona have everyone feeling a little glum. While Trick-or-Treating might be a little trickier this year, here’s an easy way to spread a little happiness this spooky season while sticking
to a budget.

To start, you’re going to want to want to set a budget. As a college student, money can sometimes be pretty tight. While you might not have a lot to give, Boo Baskets are the gift that keeps on giving. When you start this little project, keep in mind that the person you Boo is supposed to pass the treat along, Booing someone else. For this example, let’s have a budget of $20.

Once you have your budget set, make a list. On your list, start by putting a festive pail or other cute Halloween bag. Next, add a bag of candy. Aside from these two items, you’re going to want to budget your money in order to add other items to your Boo Basket. Be however creative you want!

The next step is to find your local dollar store, or any sort of inexpensive store. This example Boo Basket has items found at both the Dollar Tree and Walmart. Just to give an idea of prices, below is a list of each item, price and where each thing in the bucket was bought:

– Festive Halloween pail: $1 (Dollar Tree)
– Cute scrunchies: $1 ea. (Dollar Tree)
– Bag of candy: $1 (Dollar Tree)
– Cookie crypt kit: $6.98 (Walmart)
– 2-pack of festive socks: $3.48 (Walmart)
– Halloween hair ties: $4 (Walmart)
– Cute Halloween cup with straw: $0.98 (Walmart)
– Funny Halloween flask: $1.98 (Walmart)

This collage includes all the items found for this example basket.

This list might inspire you, but don’t feel that you have to follow the entire list yourself. Feel free to get anything you want. Just be mindful of your budget. Your friends don’t want you to go bankrupt in
order to make this basket.

Once you have gathered all of your Boo Basket materials, go ahead and place them all in the pail. If you’re feeling a little extra, throw in a piece of tissue
paper to make it look pretty.

Here’s an idea of what a finished basket might look like.

When everything is looking as you want it to, bring your baskets to your

Don’t forget to capture a your friend’s reaction when you drop the basket off to them! Pictured: Maraia Nason of Sebago, ME. Nason attends UMaine at Orono.

friends. Whether they live in the dorm room down the hall, are your roommate or reside across town, drop it off to them. Don’t forget to tell them, “You’ve just been ‘Booed!’”

Making the Best of 2020

Hello everyone, Saint and Dusty here! We hope everyone is doing well during these difficult times. It has been a strange semester, but we are happy to be back on campus with Mummy. Although we cannot see students’ faces, we still can recognize their smells. Mummy’s
classes are not in her usual spot, so we get to travel down the hall. Tuesdays and Thursdays are long days, but we get to see lots of students throughout the day.

Saint and Dusty cuddle up for PCJ 396 on Tuesday mornings.

When students come to class, they take these wet wipes from the front of the class and use them on their desks. It is very stinky, but we are getting used to it. During class time, Dusty and I lie on our cozy bed and enjoy class. We have noticed that students are spread out and do
not sit next to each other like they used to. Mummy only takes us to campus a couple days out of the week, so we try to make the best of it.

With all these changes on campus, we are staying positive for Mummy and her students. We like to greet students, especially the ones in the morning. We cannot see their faces, but we know they are smiling. This semester has been like no other, but it is our job to be there for Mummy. We are ready for whatever the rest of this year has in store for us!

A Spooky Season in a Spooky Year

Once October comes around, anybody who loves horror or getting to be someone else for the day is excited for Halloween. This year will not be the same as in the past. With the Coronavirus taking the world by storm, many holidays and gatherings have been put on pause or canceled. In many communities, trick-or-treating and Halloween gatherings will not be happening. While adapting to the pandemic, families across the country are going to have to start new traditions this Halloween.

Halloween during a pandemic might be tricky.

This year has been stressful for everyone, including children. They have had in-person school canceled, recreational sports canceled, and they have been told not to visit their grandparents because it could kill them. They have endured extreme isolation, which could potentially have an effect on their
social skills as they grow up. Like everyone else, they have had a rough year.

Other holidays this year have already been canceled. Families were forced to spend Easter and the Fourth of July at home. Trick-or-treating is also going to be very unusual this year and children will once again have to suffer the consequences.

When the end of October comes around, children usually look forward to trick-or-treating by dressing up, but it is much different this year.

“Some Halloween traditions my family and I have is decorating the inside and outside of our house. My mom makes some delicious food, and we watch movies. It must be difficult for children this year,
since they won’t be able to do those normal Halloween traditions,” UMPI sophomore Halle Garner said.

State officials around the country are advising parents and their children to avoid trick-or-treating and Halloween parties. Halloween is a special day that gives children many long-lasting memories that they
will bring with them into adulthood. This year’s Halloween is not only disappointing but stressful for children, especially since they will be missing out on experiences all people should have during their
childhood.

“I personally I think not having trick-or-treating is a smart idea because there is a pandemic going on. Going from door-to-door is not the safest, especially for children,” UMPI senior Bethany McAvoy said. “I have seen a lot of stuff online where people can still dress up at home and make their own fun.”

The Centers of Disease Control and Prevention describes trick-or-treating as “high risk activity” because of the traveling done by children from house to house. Although surfaces such as candy wrappers aren’t a significant source of spread for COVID-19, trick-or-treating can still be done safely. Smaller communities across the country are still planning trick-or-treating in their neighborhoods as long as it is done in a safe manner.

Although this holiday will be different, there are many things that families can still do to make the best out of their spooky season. Trick-or-treating is a popular Halloween tradition, but there are many other ways children can celebrate the holiday safely in a world of COVID-19.

There are a variety of ways families and their children can create new traditions in 2020. Pumpkin carving at home is fun Halloween activity, which is low risk and suggested by the CDC. A costume contest at home and through Zoom or Facetime with friends is a perfect way to show off your costume. Families can make Halloween treats and baked goods from home, which will satisfy those sweet tooth cravings. Decorating the inside and outside of your house with scary decorations could lead to a
neighborhood drive-through event. Another option is to turn down the lights and have a movie night with your family.

All of these options are great substitutes for trick-or-treating this Halloween season. Despite not being able to celebrate Halloween as usual, it is important that families are still spending the holiday together and safely. It has been a difficult year for children and their families, but they have made it this far. Adapting to this pandemic is not easy and yet families across the country are succeeding. Halloween in 2020 is going to be different, but something that this year has taught people is that we are up for a challenge.

Editor’s Letter

Hi folks,

I know it’s been a while since I’ve last written to you all! Times have certainly been extraordinary, that’s for sure. Since the last time I wrote, I have moved back home. Living somewhere that isn’t Presque Isle is something you have to get used to. Even though when I’m at school I miss home, being home has me oddly missing Presque Isle more.

For whatever the reason, I feel like I don’t need a summer break. I unfortunately lost my job due to my move home, so I have not had a whole lot of anything to do over this quarantine. The only silver lining is that my boyfriend has been quarantining with me.

I have a short but funny story. So, two-and-a-half months ago, at the beginning of quarantine, I became fixated on the idea of cutting my hair. I wanted bangs. My younger sister advised against it, as she herself had bangs and quote, “I don’t want you to copy my look.” But anyway, I started watching hair-cutting videos, mostly of women cutting their own bangs. All of the videos made it look effortless.

One Thursday, after attending my weekly PCJ Zoom meeting, I FaceTimed my best friend, Caitlyn. Cait and I were casually chatting when I got the sudden and overwhelming urge to be dramatic. Me being me, I got the scissors. Without saying anything, I walked upstairs and found a comb and clips. Walking back downstairs to my bedroom, I shut and locked my door behind me. The whole time, Cait was on FaceTime staring at me, silent, through my screen.

I took my position in front of my humongous wall mirror and began sectioning my hair like the woman in the Buzzfeed video. Holding my breath, I told my friend to encourage me. Holding my breath, I literally cut inches off and chopped the most uneven bangs. Realizing what I had done, I ran upstairs in hysterics. I was sobbing, my sister and brother were laughing, Cait was screaming over FaceTime and my mom was freaking out because she didn’t know what was going on. (What was going on was I was running around my kitchen and living room sobbing while clutching my forehead.)

Moral of the story: don’t cut your own bangs, no matter how easy Buzzfeed makes it look. My only saving grace was my sister and her ability to fix my mistake.

To close out the 2019-2020 academic year, I just wanted to thank everyone. Readers, contributors, staff writers: thank you all. I hope that everyone stays safe and healthy during these extraordinary times. I would also like to congratulate all of UMPI’s 2020 graduates. I wish we could have celebrated your hard work together.

Until this fall,

 

Abi Davis

Pictured: Abi Davis, UTimes editor.

The Quarantined Family

COVID-19 is keeping us apart. We’ve stopped having religious meetings. We’ve canceled concerts and cultural events. Children are staying home from school. We’re not going out to eat. Nobody is hanging out in bars or coffee shops. Sports teams aren’t playing anymore. In Lancaster, Pennsylvania, where I live, public officials have taken down all the basketball nets in every city park. We’re not even having traditional weddings or funerals. But that’s not the whole story.

In the middle of this turmoil, some people are getting much closer. Suddenly, people who live together are only seeing one another. The concept of family ties is taking on a whole new meaning.

Since my college closed, I’ve gotten to experience three different living arrangements. My first week of self-quarantine was spent with my roommate. For some, this setup can be very stressful. I was stuck in a house with someone who was a complete stranger less than a year earlier. Thankfully, we got along very well. We’ve perfected the art of giving each other personal space. At least I think so.

The next week, I got to experience another now-common living arrangement. Pre-quarantine, I would have said it sounded like reality TV. A family comes together from their separate adult lives. They are forced to spend life in one house with no outside contact until someone cracks. Strangely enough, this is now real life for many of us.

In week two of isolation, I drove from Maine down to Pennsylvania. I found myself sharing a house with my parents, three adult siblings and my grandmother. It was a marked change from having my own apartment. No one cracked, but there did seem to be more drama than usual. For the most part, my family was happy to see me. I was happy to eat my mom’s cooking again.

My family handled my presence heroically. “It’s maybe not as different as you might expect,” my brother Wayne told me. He seems to be holding up well under added family interaction. “In a lot of ways, it’s the same – except with more time,” he said.

In week three, my quarantine shuffle continued. I found an apartment where I could better work from home. I moved in. I now live completely alone. I live only a few blocks away from my parents. My brother James and his wife live a few more blocks away. Being a family in this time has taken on a new meaning. We’ve walked to one another’s houses to leave food on the porch. Sometimes we will stand outside just to talk from a safe distance. And my family has created the long-avoided group chat.

I’ve lived far away from my family for years. Now I’m very close to them, but we never really meet. It is truly a strange time. Now, more than ever, adaptability is key. Technology has often been called an enemy of relationships. Now, it seems to be holding some relationships together. I regularly see my family members on Zoom game nights. Wayne seemed hopeful about the role of the internet in isolation social life. “I think people are being more purposeful,” he said of online interactions.


Empty playground equipment behind my new apartment.

I agree. This is the time to finally create a meaningful online presence. We all know people who are alone or living with people they don’t always want to talk to. The times are unusual. We have to be different from usual. Create a new version of family. Find new ways to connect with friends. Find someone to vent to if you need to vent. Taking the initiative to reach out to somebody can help us all. It’s not easy, but we can do it.

Sudden Changes

It started like any other Friday morning, uneventful and quiet. The air was thick with the promise of the peace weekends are known for. The coffee that morning was strong and thick like maple syrup. Honestly, that Friday morning passed like so many others in their own placid way. But by noon, a storm had come ashore.

All morning, a flurry of rumors had been brewing on the other side of the world. Thousands of miles away an unimaginable disaster was unfolding. It was as if we had traveled back to 1918.

Throughout that morning there were rumblings — like distant thunder — of concerns. Nothing seemed certain anymore. The tension was so thick we could have cut it with a knife, but a feeling of uncertainty had blunted that knife’s edge. Amid this downpour of information the one thing that struck me as odd was this happened on Friday, March 13.

All of this came to a head — at light speed — when my employer announced at 3 p.m. that it would close to the public due to the spread of COVID-19 in America. The closure would start at 5 p.m. that day. All we could do was go home and wait to hear more. I thought I’d be back Monday morning as usual. There is no more usual.

Late that Sunday, I learned that I would be working remotely on Monday and that more information would follow. Monday came quickly. I set up at my kitchen table with only my personal laptop and cell phone. This was my new office.

So, how have I navigated these uncharted waters? Carefully, and with all the tools I can find to ease this sudden change. The last time I went to the office was Tuesday, March 17. It was like entering a cemetery, oddly quiet and certain.

Honestly, this has been great in more ways than it’s been bad. I am working from home full time now. That is something I’ve wished for like a small child wishes at Christmas. The benefits far outweigh the drawbacks. I don’t set an alarm as early as I did before. This means less of the buzzing, ringing, invasive mechanical steward policing my consciousness. My wife and I are also enjoying daily hot breakfasts and second cups of coffee. It’s nice, really nice.

And while there’s something to be said for not needing socks to work, this shift has required some quick thinking, moving and adjusting. Here’s a brief look at two of those things.

The first thing is space. We rent a sixth-floor one-bedroom apartment in downtown Portland. While this allots us great views of the sea-faded brickwork that is Portland, it doesn’t leave a lot of space for an office. So how do we deal with this small, yet comfortable, arrangement? Keeping my work to the kitchen table — and between the hours of 9 and 5 — helps. Headphones help keep the sounds of meetings separate. Taking an actual lunch break, and a coffee break, and snack breaks and pet-the-cats-breaks helps manage the space.

The other major requirement is technology. My work provides a laptop for my use — thankfully. But something that I never fully appreciated was the need for an actual mouse. Without one my wrist cramps as if someone crocheted my tendons into mittens. WI-FI, good lighting, comfortable furniture, pens and on and on are all helpful. The idea is to build a miniature and mobile office. One that has everything you need but can be put away for Friday night pizza.

This photo is something Nathan sees on any given day.

Overall, the past few weeks have been many things. This time has been interesting, unusual, strange, uncertain and even a little scary. Amid all of this, it’s important to remember that being safe, healthy and working from home is a fortunate way to be. We’ll continue to do what we can. We’ll get through this, together.

 

Virtual Comfort

Josh Tate considers himself an introvert. As such, self-quarantine doesn’t strike him as too bad. There’s a part of him that really doesn’t mind being in isolation. But he is also what he calls a “professional extrovert.” Tate is a pastor at State Road Advent Christian Church in Mapleton, Maine. “I think being a pastor is irreducibly relational,” Tate says.

Rapid policy changes in response to COVID-19 have caused upheaval in most sectors of life. Churches and other houses of worship find themselves in particularly strange circumstances.

State Road held its last normal Sunday service on March 15. During the service, Tate told worshippers that the church planned to keep meeting. By the middle of the next week, however, plans had totally changed. State Road canceled all church meetings.

Dale Charles is co-pastor of Ignite Church of Lancaster in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. Ignite Church is a small, urban congregation. Charles described a similar change of plans. “When the coronavirus started coming, we decided we were going to have church anyway,” Charles said. “The next Sunday, we had double attendance because of other churches shutting down.” Charles hadn’t expected that surge. By the next Sunday, they too had canceled services.

Dale Charles at his new pulpit.

Many churches have started to livestream their services. Ignite Church worshippers have met via YouTube Live. The technology was glitchy at times. Lags and pauses complicated their simple Bible study. Charles wasn’t very happy with the setup.

State Road is much larger than Ignite Church. State Road has more resources available. The church recently spent around $2,000 to improve its streaming setup.

Sunday services are only a small part of church life. Pastoral visitation cannot continue. Children’s clubs are canceled. Pastors cannot meet with people they are advising. Church buildings sit empty. In times of upheaval, many people seek help from the church. In this situation, they can’t. At least, they can’t do it in traditional ways.

Charles has started calling and texting his church members regularly. It hasn’t been an easy adjustment for him, but he wants to keep checking in. He feels that he hasn’t cultivated online relationships very well in the past. He is trying to quickly strengthen his digital communication skills. “I’ve tended to see technology as a business tool, and not great for relationships,” Charles said. He’s trying to be more personable in texts and calls.

Tate has joined Facebook. He is using his statuses and posts to stay connected with his church members. He is doing much more phone conversation than before. In the absence of children’s clubs, he is using Facebook to encourage parents to fill these roles with their children. Tate sees these measures as ways to tide the congregation over. He looks forward to seeing his parishioners in person again. “My job is to be in relationships with people,” Tate said. “That’s made very difficult by isolation.”

Tate’s job itself is in an unusual position. “I want to work hard and earn my living – and I can’t do my job,” Tate said. As a full-time pastor, he has nothing else to fall back on. Tate has encouraged church members to consider redirecting their usual giving to needy members of the community instead of to the church. State Road also continues to employ its janitors. They now clean the empty building.

As co-pastor of a small church, Charles also works as an auto mechanic to support himself. This business is considered essential, but it has slowed down. Charles hopes to take this extra time to connect one-on-one with his church members.

Both pastors see hope in the situation. Charles senses a new thoughtfulness in his city. He hopes that he can use his extra time to help people. And even in uncertain times, Tate feels support by his community. “I think people are extending a lot of grace because of the current situation,” he said. It is the hope of both pastors that they can still bless their communities. They believe there is a purpose even in this crisis. All we have to do is find it.

Murder in Millinocket

A Millinocket man died after a shooting that occurred on Sunday,  March 15, 2020. Cameron James Pelkey, 23, was tragically shot during an altercation before officials could get involved. He died days later at Northern Light Eastern Maine Medical Center in Bangor, where he had been treated. The incident took place in a Millinocket home at 308B Penobscot Ave., where Pelkey was being held hostage along with another man and a woman.

Pelkey was life flighted to Bangor after being shot. The other two hostages were taken out of harm’s way as law enforcement apprehended the shooter. The small town of Millinocket is left wondering how something like this could happen.

“It’s messed up. I think I heard the gunshot from my house. I didn’t think anything cynical was going on when I first heard it,” Kyle Cocoran, who was a former friend of Pelkey, said.

The shooter was 45-year-old Jason Mulligan, who lived in Bangor before the incident. Mulligan is being held at the Penobscot County Jail in Bangor in connection with Pelkey’s death. He is being charged with murder now that the victim has died and currently is facing up to life in prison.

Pictured above is the shooter, Jason Mulligan.

Pelkey’s last good deed was carried out Thursday, March 19. It was always his decision to donate life so that others might have a chance to live, so his organs were donated to those in need.

Many are mourning the loss of young Cameron Pelkey’s life, from his family of blood or by bond to the people he worked with and surrounded himself with daily.

“I used to work with him a few years back. Cameron was a good guy. I can’t believe someone would set out to hurt him,”  Kyle Cocoran said.

The motive in Pelkey’s death is still officially undetermined. The town hopes to heal from this great loss. Unfortunately, due to the pandemic, funeral arrangements are being withheld for the time being. The family would like to remember Pelkey’s contentment and peaceful lifestyle along with his sense of humor. Pelkey’s friends will remember  a caring soul who was always there when times were tough.

“If you wish to do something in memory of Cameron, please consider donating blood or becoming an organ donor at RegisterMe.org,” the Pelkey family said.

Victim, Cameron Pelkey.