Kalikantzari: Greek Christmas Elves

A depiction of what a Kalikantzaros looks like.

They are tiny, ugly and skinny little creatures that appear during the Christmas days. Their only purpose is for 12 days to make the lives of humans miserable. Their name comes from the Greek word “καλός” which means good, and “κάνθαρος” which means beetle. Continue reading “Kalikantzari: Greek Christmas Elves”

Do You Deck the Halls Before Thanksgiving?

Snowmen playing Christmas music

With Christmas right around the corner, it’s time to deck the halls and blast Michael Buble’s holiday album on repeat. While people are just beginning to celebrate the holiday season with the commencement of Thanksgiving and Black Friday, there’s been an ongoing debate of when it’s appropriate to blare your speakers with Jingle Bells and other Christmas tunes. Continue reading “Do You Deck the Halls Before Thanksgiving?”

First Harvest Festival a Success!

People look around to see what treats they can buy. Photo by Jacob Pelkey

Some people got some Christmas shopping done early.  The Micmac Harvest Festival took place on Nov. 17.  About 16 vendors from Aroostook County went to Micmac Farms from 9 a.m.- 4 p.m. and sold their goods.  Some of the items sold were pickled foods, jellies, jams, teas, meat and baked goods.  Continue reading “First Harvest Festival a Success!”

Editor’s Letter

Hello Readers,

The hum of the holidays is here and the excitement of the first few snowfalls here in the county has spread throughout most of us. This special time of year is important to me because it reminds me of how good people can be. Generosity and kindness bloom in the cold weather and we all become a little closer: whether it be your neighbor helping you get your car out of the snowy driveway after a bad storm or a complete stranger wishing you a happy holiday in passing. The best of everyone comes out during the holidays.  It reminds me of the Grinch in that everyone’s hearts seem to grow at least three sizes.

With a cheerful spirit and Thanksgiving on my mind, I leave you with this issue. It comes with a wish to enjoy and remind you of all the great things our campus and community do. This year I’m thankful for UMPI, and especially the people who make UMPI and the University Times possible.

Have a great day,

Brandy Smith
University Times Editor

Agriculture Coming to UMPI

 

Debbie Roark, Mary Barton Akeley Smith, Ray Rice and Brett Varnum signing the paperwork at the ceremony.

The Multipurpose Room at UMPI was packed on Oct. 23. Mary Barton Akeley Smith was giving $1 million dollars to the university to create its first endowed chair. She gave the gift in memory of her late husband and named the gift after her father, Dr. Robert Vinton Akeley. The faculty position that this gift will fund was named Dr. Robert Vinton Akeley Chair of Agricultural Science and Agribusiness. Continue reading “Agriculture Coming to UMPI”

It Floats at the For

This years theme at Fright at the Fort was based on Stephen King’s horror novels.

Imagine delving deep into the belly of a historical fort while running through cornfields, being chased by clowns with chainsaws and rounding a corner only to be confronted by the twin girls from Stephen King’s “The Shining.” This is exactly the kind of fright that happened on Saturday, Oct. 27, at Fort Knox. Continue reading “It Floats at the For”

Seasonal Affective Disorder

seasonal affective disorder

Research on Seasonal Affective Disorder began in 1979 by Herb Kern. He did this because he was curious about why he felt depressed in the winter months. The first use of the term Seasonal Affective Disorder was back in 1984 in a paper by Norman Rosenthal. The paper talked about the cause and how circadian rhythm can affect the role of melatonin. SAD was not recognized until 1993 when he published his book “Winter Blues”. Continue reading “Seasonal Affective Disorder”